Voter Information

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Find out what you need to vote in the CSRD’s Electoral Areas election.

In order to register to vote at an election, a person must be eligible to vote as either a Resident Elector or a Non-Resident Property Elector (there is no corporate vote) and have the required identification with them at the time of voting.

Voter Eligibility and Requirements:

In order to be eligible to vote locally as a resident or non-resident property elector, a person must:

  • Be 18 years of age or older when they register to vote, or 18 years or older on general voting day,
  • Be a Canadian citizen,
  • Have been a resident of B. C. for at least six months before they register to vote,
  • Have either lived or owned property in the jurisdiction in which they intend to vote for at least 30 days before they register to vote, and
  • Not be disqualified under the Local Government Act, or any other enactment, or by law from voting in a local election

Voting rights are granted to citizens based on residency or property ownership. There is no corporate or business vote in local elections.

Eligible electors who live on a First Nation reserve can vote. Where that person votes depends on whether the reserve is located within a municipality or regional district jurisdiction.

Non-Resident Property Electors 

When a person lives in one jurisdiction and owns property in one or more other jurisdictions, they may vote once in each of the other jurisdictions where they own property -- as long as they meet the voter eligibility requirements.

If a person owns a property with one or more other individuals, only one person is eligible to vote as the non-resident property elector for that property. The owner entitled to vote must be designated, in writing, by the majority of the property owners.

A person cannot vote on behalf of a corporation, or as a non-resident property elector, based on a property owned wholly or in part by a corporation.

Non Resident Property Elector Application form
Non Resident Property Elector Consent form

Students

Students who live in one jurisdiction and attend an educational institution in a jurisdiction different from their usual place of residence may vote only once--either in the jurisdiction where they attend school or in the jurisdiction that is their usual place of residence.

Voter Ineligibility

Resident electors and non-resident property electors are not eligible to vote in a local election if they:

  • Have been convicted and sentenced for an indictable offence and are in custody
  • Have been found guilty of an election offence, such as intimidation or vote-buying
  • Do not otherwise meet voter eligibility requirements.

 

Voter FAQs

Find answers to some of the most commonly asked questions.

When is General Voting Day?

General Voting Day for local government elections will be Saturday, October 20, 2018.

How do I vote?

The CSRD uses same day registration. You can register to vote at a polling station prior to voting either at an Advanced Voting Opportunity or on General Voting Day. Mail in ballot (voting) is also available by completing an application to vote by mail if you are unable to attend a voting station.

You must have two (2) pieces of identification that prove who you are and where you live. The ID must show your residential address and one of them must have your signature. If your ID does not show your residential address, you can make what is called a “solemn declaration” as to your residence.  The voting clerk will have the form you need to use to make that declaration. Examples are: a Driver’s Licence, Care Card, Credit Card or a utility bill or tax notice. 

Please note that a combined Driver’s Licence/Care Card is considered to be only one (1) piece of identification.

Voting locations will be announced after the close of the nomination period, which ends September 14, 2018. Check here for updates.

I'm not going to be available on Election Day. Can I vote in advance?

Yes, there will be an advance voting opportunity on October 10, 2018 and October 17,2018.

Further information on advance polls and the specific voting locations will be published after the election is declared. Check back for updates. 

Who can I ask if I have questions about the election process?

The Chief Election Officer is responsible for conducting the general local election in accordance with the Local Government Act and local election bylaws. If you have questions about the election process, contact the CSRD’s Chief Election Officer by phoning 250.832.8194 or emailing Elections@csrd.bc.ca.

The Chief Election Officer does not investigate alleged election offences or administer penalties.  The police and the courts enforce general election offences.

You can get answers to questions about election advertising, third party sponsors and campaign financing by contacting Elections BC.  Elections BC and the courts enforce election campaign financing and advertising offences.

If you need additional assistance, contact the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing Governance and Structure Branch.

 

 

Do I have to register in advance of General Voting Day?

No. The CSRD uses Same Day Registration. You can register to vote at a voting place prior to voting. Just remember to take two pieces of identification with you if you are a resident voter. ID must show your residential address and one of them must have your signature.
If you are registering as a non-resident property elector, you must also provide the address or legal description and the title (or other proof of ownership) of the property you are registering to vote in relation to. If you own the property with other people, you will need their written consent to vote on behalf of them.

Do I need identification in order to vote?

Yes. You must have two (2) pieces of identification (ID) that prove who you are and where you live. The ID must show your residential address and one of them must have your signature. If your ID doesn't show your residential address, you can make what is called a "solemn declaration" as to your residence. The voting clerk will have the form you need to use to make that declaration.

If you are registering as a non-resident property elector, you must also provide the address or legal description and the title (or other proof of ownership) of the property you own. If you are one of two or more owners, you must also demonstrate - in writing - that you have the consent of the majority of all owners to vote on behalf of them in the election.

What forms of ID are acceptable?

To register as a resident elector, you need two pieces of identification that prove who you are and where you live – one piece must include your signature. If the identification provided does not establish where you live, you will also need to make a solemn declaration as to your residency.  

To register as a non-resident property elector, you need two pieces of identification that prove who you are and where you live – one piece must include your signature. You must also bring the following documentation:

if applicable, a consent form signed by a majority of registered owners authorizing you to register as the property’s non-resident property elector proof of ownership such as a property tax notice, assessment notice, or certificate of title.

Acceptable identification includes:

  • BC Driver’s Licence;
  • BC Identification Card;
  • Credit or Debit Card;
  • Residential Property Tax Notice;
  • Utility Bill;
  • BC CareCard or GoldCard;
  • Citizenship Card;
  • ICBC Certificate of Insurance;
  • Social Insurance Card.

Please note: The combined BC Driver's Licence and CareCard is considered one piece of ID.

I am a member of a First Nation, living on reserve. Can I vote in a local government election?

Yes. Eligible Members and non-members of a First Nation that reside on a reserve that meet the requirements of a resident elector, can vote. Where you vote depends on whether the reserve is located within a municipality or a regional district electoral area. Check with your nearest local government office to determine within which boundary your reserve is located.

I moved here two weeks before General Voting Day. Can I vote?

No. You must have resided in the electoral area for 30 days to be eligible to vote. (September 19, 2018 is the last day to meet local residency requirement if registering on General Voting Day.)

I am not a Canadian Citizen. Can I vote?

You must be a Canadian citizen to be eligible to vote.

Can I vote by mail?

 Yes. Those wanting to vote by mail will need to make an application to do so.

Download application form
Can I vote through the Internet or by telephone?

No. The legislation does not currently allow for voting through the Internet or telephone.

I own more than one property, do I get an extra vote?

No. Each elector is entitled to one vote only.

I own a company, do I get an extra vote?

No. There is no corporate or business vote in local government elections. Voting rights are granted to citizens on the basis of residency or property ownership. This means that you cannot vote on behalf of a corporation, or as a non-resident property elector, based on a property owned wholly or in part by a corporation.

I don't live in the jurisdiction, but I own property. Can I vote?

If you are a resident of British Columbia, own property in the electoral area and are otherwise qualified, you may be able to vote as a non-resident property elector. If you own the property with other non-resident electors, only one of you can vote. You must have the written consent of the other owners to cast the ballot. If you own property along with a corporation, then none of the owners of the property are eligible to vote. If you own more than one piece of property in the proposed electoral area, you may only vote in relation to one.

How will I know where to vote?

Voting locations will be announced after the close of the nomination period, which ends September 14, 2018. Check back here for updates.

Can I take someone into the voting booth to help me?

Yes. If you need assistance, an election official may assist you to vote. If you are caring for someone (e.g. a child or elderly relative) at the time you cast your ballot, the presiding election official may allow you to have that person in the booth with you.
Anyone providing assistance to another elector is required to sign a solemn declaration before providing any assistance. Speak to the presiding election official at the voting place for further information.

Where can I find information on election results?

The results will be posted on the CSRD website, the Civic Info website and will also be published in local newspapers.